Tuesday, June 09, 2009

Rainy Tuesday News ---- 06/09/09

Ahem, if you type "UMass Football" into Microsoft's new search engine Bing, guess what shows up at the top of the list...

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The University of South Alabama is starting a football team this year. They will play FCS/I-AA football for two years (2010 and 2011) and then jump right into I-A football. Despite the fact that they have not played a game, the Jags have games scheduled with Mississippi State, Navy and Kent State.

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For the first time in a number of years, UMass does not have a recruit in the NY/NJ football classic.

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Phil Steele will 100+ pages of FCS/I-AA coverage in his Eastern Regional magazine this year (it was in the Western Regional last year). His national publication is due out today.

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There are very, very few active FCS/I-AA blogs out there. One of the few that is active is the Lehigh Football Nation and that site has a comment on Fordham adding scholarships.

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10 comments:

Anonymous said...

I wonder if the article on South Alabama is accurate. I recall reading that newly created Division I football programs must play at the FCS level for 4 years before moving to FBS. If nothing else, 2 years per the South Alabama timeline isn't enough time to acquire enough scholarship players to meet FBS minimums, because you can only add 20-something scholarship players to the roster per year. That's why Old Dominion and Georgia State have to wait until their third seasons just to join the CAA.

Anonymous said...

i dont know about the rules
but Alabama is a state that is real serious about their football

Anonymous said...

Can't be much more serious than UMass who budgets a $2,000.000 loss in fball.

Anonymous said...

what are the reasons that a university would have to budget
for a loss

Anonymous said...

to appropriate other budget revenues to pay for the football monetary loss.

Anonymous said...

UMass's "podunk" attitude towards the football program is the reason. Hell, it took us how many years befor we even got lights. Since this the attendance has improved in spite of a lack luster season. I hope before I get out we at least have regularly scheduled night games to attend. This years' was a blast.

Anonymous said...

One could say the same about Harvard (installation of lights). And look how much money they have....

Anonymous said...

Good point, but I don't care about Harvard does. Besides this, Harvard has a reputation for being an exceptional academic institution and is known around the globe. While we are a very good public academic university we aren't recognized like Harvard. Nor should we be based on our admission standards. Yet, I think going D-1A in football like UConn did would bring us national recognition exposing more of our academic prowness.

Anonymous said...

trying to go D1 when the president of the university and the rest of the board is not behind you is a recipe for disaster. they have to make a 100% comimitment to the program or else it will fail miserably. look at the training facility and the locker rooms for the football team for example.if they were willing to commit do you think brown would have left

Anonymous said...

A move [to FBS] would have to be initiated by a major allocation of funds, which the state does not have, and presumably will not, for the forseeable future, starting with a stadium and ancillary means of support, requiring many millions to fund. I am of the belief that if they build it [the program, stadium, infrastructure]. they [students, alumni, football fans of the Commonwealth] will come. It has worked in Connecticut, it's working in Buffalo to a lesser degree, and it certainly works in more college football-rich states. Florida Atlantic is building a stunning new stadium on campus; Florida International is in the process of building out their existing facility: It;s a matter of perceived demand and available funding, and now, the timing couldn't be worse. But a commitment from the Regents would certainly create the buzz needed for investment of fans, creating interest, and drawing students from around the country.